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Format Strings

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File Properties / Timing / Date time format

Identical to DateTime format strings of .NET.

 

Format specifier Description Examples
"d" The day of the month, from 1 through 31.
More information: The "d" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-01T13:45:30 -> 12009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 15
"dd" The day of the month, from 01 through 31.
More information: The "dd" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-01T13:45:30 -> 012009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 15
"ddd" The abbreviated name of the day of the week.
More information: The "ddd" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> Mon (en-US)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> Пн (ru-RU)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> lun. (fr-FR)
"dddd" The full name of the day of the week.
More information: The "dddd" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> Monday (en-US
)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> понедельник (ru-RU)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> lundi (fr-FR)
"f" The tenths of a second in a date and time value.
More information: The "f" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.6170000 -> 6
2009-06-15T13:45:30.05 -> 0
"ff" The hundredths of a second in a date and time value.
More information: The "ff" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.6170000 -> 61
2009-06-15T13:45:30.0500000 -> 00
"fff" The milliseconds in a date and time value.
More information: The "fff" Custom Format Specifier.
6/15/2009 13:45:30.617 -> 617
6/15/2009 13:45:30.0005 -> 000
"ffff" The ten thousandths of a second in a date and time value.
More information: The "ffff" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175000 -> 6175
2009-06-15T13:45:30.0000500 -> 0000
"fffff" The hundred thousandths of a second in a date and time value.
More information: The "fffff" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175400 -> 61754
6/15/2009 13:45:30.000005 -> 00000
"ffffff" The millionths of a second in a date and time value.
More information: The "ffffff" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175420 -> 617542
2009-06-15T13:45:30.0000005 -> 000000
"fffffff" The ten millionths of a second in a date and time value.
More information: The "fffffff" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175425 -> 6175425
2009-06-15T13:45:30.0001150 -> 0001150
"F" If non-zero, the tenths of a second in a date and time value.
More information: The "F" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.6170000 -> 6
2009-06-15T13:45:30.0500000 -> (no output)
"FF" If non-zero, the hundredths of a second in a date and time value.
More information: The "FF" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.6170000 -> 61
2009-06-15T13:45:30.0050000 -> (no output)
"FFF" If non-zero, the milliseconds in a date and time value.
More information: The "FFF" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.6170000 -> 617
2009-06-15T13:45:30.0005000 -> (no output)
"FFFF" If non-zero, the ten thousandths of a second in a date and time value.
More information: The "FFFF" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.5275000 -> 5275
2009-06-15T13:45:30.0000500 -> (no output)
"FFFFF" If non-zero, the hundred thousandths of a second in a date and time value.
More information: The "FFFFF" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175400 -> 61754
2009-06-15T13:45:30.0000050 -> (no output)
"FFFFFF" If non-zero, the millionths of a second in a date and time value.
More information: The "FFFFFF" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175420 -> 617542
2009-06-15T13:45:30.0000005 -> (no output)
"FFFFFFF" If non-zero, the ten millionths of a second in a date and time value.
More information: The "FFFFFFF" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175425 -> 6175425
2009-06-15T13:45:30.0001150 -> 000115
"g", "gg" The period or era.
More information: The "g" or "gg" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30.6170000 -> A.D.
"h" The hour, using a 12-hour clock from 1 to 12.
More information: The "h" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T01:45:30 -> 1
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 1
"hh" The hour, using a 12-hour clock from 01 to 12.
More information: The "hh" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T01:45:30 -> 01
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 01
"H" The hour, using a 24-hour clock from 0 to 23.
More information: The "H" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T01:45:30 -> 1
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 13
"HH" The hour, using a 24-hour clock from 00 to 23.
More information: The "HH" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T01:45:30 -> 01
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 13
"K" Time zone information.
More information: The "K" Custom Format Specifier.
With DateTime values:
2009-06-15T13:45:30, Kind Unspecified ->
2009-06-15T13:45:30, Kind Utc -> Z
2009-06-15T13:45:30, Kind Local -> -07:00
(depends on local computer settings)
With DateTimeOffset values:
2009-06-15T01:45:30-07:00 --> -07:00
2009-06-15T08:45:30+00:00 --> +00:00
"m" The minute, from 0 through 59.
More information: The "m" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T01:09:30 -> 9
2009-06-15T13:29:30 -> 29
"mm" The minute, from 00 through 59.
More information: The "mm" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T01:09:30 -> 09
2009-06-15T01:45:30 -> 45
"M" The month, from 1 through 12.
More information: The "M" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 6
"MM" The month, from 01 through 12.
More information: The "MM" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 06
"MMM" The abbreviated name of the month.
More information: The "MMM" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> Jun (en-US)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> juin (fr-FR)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> Jun (zu-ZA)
"MMMM" The full name of the month.
More information: The "MMMM" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> June (en-US)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> juni (da-DK)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> uJuni (zu-ZA)
"s" The second, from 0 through 59.
More information: The "s" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:09 -> 9
"ss" The second, from 00 through 59.
More information: The "ss" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:09 -> 09
"t" The first character of the AM/PM designator.
More information: The "t" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> P (en-US)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> (ja-JP)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> (fr-FR)
"tt" The AM/PM designator.
More information: The "tt" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> PM (en-US)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 午後 (ja-JP)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> (fr-FR)
"y" The year, from 0 to 99.
More information: The "y" Custom Format Specifier.
0001-01-01T00:00:00 -> 1
0900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 0
1900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 0
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 9
2019-06-15T13:45:30 -> 19
"yy" The year, from 00 to 99.
More information: The "yy" Custom Format Specifier.
0001-01-01T00:00:00 -> 01
0900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 00
1900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 00
2019-06-15T13:45:30 -> 19
"yyy" The year, with a minimum of three digits.
More information: The "yyy" Custom Format Specifier.
0001-01-01T00:00:00 -> 001
0900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 900
1900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 1900
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 2009
"yyyy" The year as a four-digit number.
More information: The "yyyy" Custom Format Specifier.
0001-01-01T00:00:00 -> 0001
0900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 0900
1900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 1900
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 2009
"yyyyy" The year as a five-digit number.
More information: The "yyyyy" Custom Format Specifier.
0001-01-01T00:00:00 -> 00001
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 02009
"z" Hours offset from UTC, with no leading zeros.
More information: The "z" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30-07:00 -> -7
"zz" Hours offset from UTC, with a leading zero for a single-digit value.
More information: The "zz" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30-07:00 -> -07
"zzz" Hours and minutes offset from UTC.
More information: The "zzz" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30-07:00 -> -07:00
":" The time separator.
More information: The ":" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> : (en-US)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> . (it-IT)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> : (ja-JP)
"/" The date separator.
More Information: The "/" Custom Format Specifier.
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> / (en-US)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> - (ar-DZ)
2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> . (tr-TR)
"string"'string' Literal string delimiter. 2009-06-15T13:45:30 ("arr:" h:m t) -> arr: 1:45 P
2009-06-15T13:45:30 ('arr:' h:m t) -> arr: 1:45 P
% Defines the following character as a custom format specifier.
More information: Using Single Custom Format Specifiers.
2009-06-15T13:45:30 (%h) -> 1
\ The escape character. 2009-06-15T13:45:30 (h \h) -> 1 h
Any other character The character is copied to the result string unchanged.
More information: Using the Escape Character.
2009-06-15T01:45:30 (arr hh:mm t) -> arr 01:45 A

Time To Text module / Date Time Format pin

Identical to format strings of C/C++ strftime.

Format Code Meaning
%a Abbreviated weekday name
%A Full weekday name
%b Abbreviated month name
%B Full month name
%c Date and time representation appropriate for locale
%d Day of month as decimal number (01 – 31)
%H Hour in 24-hour format (00 – 23)
%I Hour in 12-hour format (01 – 12)
%j Day of year as decimal number (001 – 366)
%m Month as decimal number (01 – 12)
%M Minute as decimal number (00 – 59)
%p Current locale's A.M./P.M. indicator for 12-hour clock
%S Second as decimal number (00 – 59)
%U Week of year as decimal number, with Sunday as first day of week (00 – 53)
%w Weekday as decimal number (0 – 6; Sunday is 0)
%W Week of year as decimal number, with Monday as first day of week (00 – 53)
%x Date representation for current locale
%X Time representation for current locale
%y Year without century, as decimal number (00 – 99)
%Y Year with century, as decimal number
%z, %Z Either the time-zone name or time zone abbreviation, depending on registry settings; no characters if time zone is unknown
%% Percent sign

The # flag may prefix any formatting code. In that case, the meaning of the format code is changed as follows.

Format code Meaning
%#a, %#A, %#b, %#B, %#p, %#X, %#z, %#Z, %#% # flag is ignored.
%#c Long date and time representation, appropriate for current locale.
For example: "Tuesday, March 14, 1995, 12:41:29".
%#x Long date representation, appropriate to current locale.
For example: "Tuesday, March 14, 1995".
%#d, %#H, %#I, %#j, %#m, %#M, %#S, %#U, %#w, %#W, %#y, %#Y Remove leading zeros (if any).

Scalar To Text, Format Scalars, Format Vector modules / Format pin

Identical to format strings of C/C++ printf, but restricted to the float/double type.

%[flags] [width] [.precision] type

Type

Type Character Argument Output format
e Floating-point Signed value that has the form [ – ]d.dddd e [sign]dd[d] where d is one decimal digit, dddd is one or more decimal digits, dd[d] is two or three decimal digits depending on the output format and size of the exponent, and sign is + or –.
E Floating-point Identical to the e format except that E rather than e introduces the exponent.
f Floating-point Signed value that has the form [ – ]dddd.dddd, where dddd is one or more decimal digits. The number of digits before the decimal point depends on the magnitude of the number, and the number of digits after the decimal point depends on the requested precision.
g Floating-point Signed values are displayed in f or e format, whichever is more compact for the given value and precision. The e format is used only when the exponent of the value is less than –4 or greater than or equal to the precision argument. Trailing zeros are truncated, and the decimal point appears only if one or more digits follow it.
G Floating-point Identical to the g format, except that E, rather than e, introduces the exponent (where appropriate).
a Floating-point Signed hexadecimal double-precision floating-point value that has the form [−]0xh.hhhh p±dd, where h.hhhh are the hex digits (using lower case letters) of the mantissa, and dd are one or more digits for the exponent. The precision specifies the number of digits after the point.
A Floating-point Signed hexadecimal double-precision floating-point value that has the form [−]0Xh.hhhh P±dd, where h.hhhh are the hex digits (using capital letters) of the mantissa, and dd are one or more digits for the exponent. The precision specifies the number of digits after the point.

Precision

Type Meaning Default
e, E The precision specifies the number of digits to be printed after the decimal point. The last printed digit is rounded. Default precision is 6. If precision is 0 or the period (.) appears without a number following it, no decimal point is printed.
f The precision value specifies the number of digits after the decimal point. If a decimal point appears, at least one digit appears before it. The value is rounded to the appropriate number of digits. Default precision is 6. If precision is 0, or if the period (.) appears without a number following it, no decimal point is printed.
g, G The precision specifies the maximum number of significant digits printed. Six significant digits are printed, and any trailing zeros are truncated.

Flags

Flag Meaning Default
Left align the result within the given field width. Right align.
+ Use a sign (+ or –) to prefix the output value if it is of a signed type. Sign appears only for negative signed values (–).
0 If width is prefixed by 0, leading zeros are added until the minimum width is reached. If both 0 and appear, the 0 is ignored. If 0 is specified as an integer format (i, u, x, X,o, d) and a precision specification is also present—for example, %04.d—the 0 is ignored. No padding.
blank (' ') Use a blank to prefix the output value if it is signed and positive. The blank is ignored if both the blank and + flags appear. No blank appears.
# When it's used with the o, x, or X format, the # flag uses 0, 0x, or 0X, respectively, to prefix any nonzero output value. No blank appears.
  When it's used with the e, E, f, a or A format, the # flag forces the output value to contain a decimal point. Decimal point appears only if digits follow it.
  When it's used with the g or G format, the # flag forces the output value to contain a decimal point and prevents the truncation of trailing zeros.Ignored when used with c, d, i, u, or s. Decimal point appears only if digits follow it. Trailing zeros are truncated.

 

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